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Pet Dryers

A Groomer’s Best Friend
Whether it’s true or not – we have all heard that ‘diamonds are a girl’s best friend’. But, if you make your living in the grooming industry, you will find that ‘dryers are a groomer’s best friend’! Time really is money in the grooming profession, and the equipment you use has to help you make the most of every minute.

Choosing the Right Scissors for You

Recent conversations where groomers gather to share their thoughts found me reading about how frustrated stylists can be with pet owners who do not understand our work. It made me think about other service providers who must sometimes find their customers to be vexing. Then it occurred to me that I bet the folks that sharpen our scissors can find we groomers a bit annoying.

How to Make Your Blades Fly Through Coat

Today, blade manufacturers are painting blades with a certain kind of paint to make them glide through coat. When the blades are used for an extended period of time, the paint starts to flake off because dog hair is very coarse and aggressive. These paint chips are hard to get out of the coat, short of washing the dog again.

High-End Brushes and Combs

Are they really worth the expense?
Oh, how times have changed in the pet care industry – and every groomer can be very thankful that they have. Not so long ago, groomers had a very limited selection when it came to choosing the combs and brushes that help them perform their jobs.

The Importance of ‘Liquid Tools’

Back in ancient times, when I was a new groomer, the variety of shampoos and conditioners designed for pet use could be counted on one hand. There were just a few brands, and those brands had a very limited variety of products. They could be depended on to get dogs clean, keep static down and maybe help a bit with detangling…

Who’s In Control?

Every spring a friend of mine lovingly plants flowers along the walkway leading to her shop entrance. Without fail, a client walking their exuberant dog on a retractable lead will decapitate all her flowers. But it is not just the daisies that bear the brunt of a pet that is not in someone’s control.

How to Properly Oil a Clipper Blade

It doesn’t take that much oil to oil a blade, most groomers over oil them. When you over oil, the oil will drain through the teeth and onto the coat. So they turn to other forms of lubrication like Spray Coolants, Rem Oil, or WD-40. Blade oil is the best form of lubrication.

Blade Plaque

Blade plaque is that stuff that sticks to the inside of the teeth on your clipper blades. Most don’t pay attention to it, but in reality it’s something you need to remove and keep off your blades as part of your blade cleaning process.

Grooming Apparel Pairing Function with Fashion

When you get dressed for a day of grooming, do you glance in the mirror and think, “Wow! I really look good?” Well, you should. In order to do your best work, you need to feel good about yourself and the way that you look. Your appearance plays a major role in the way your clients perceive and treat you. Pet parents want to know that their precious fur babies are being cared for by a qualified stylist, and professional attire helps reinforce that confidence.

Preventing Clipper Cord Problems

Some groomers have been experiencing cord problems with clippers that have voltage converters on the end of the cord. These converters adapt 120 volts AC to DC current that runs your clipper. DC motors have more torque and seem to hold speed better in tough coat. Because of the extra weight of some of these cords, they break and short out right behind the clipper.

Holiday Wish List

During this time of holiday gifting, I suggest you take some time to consider some grooming tools that you could (and should) either ask for as gifts or put your holiday tip money towards. Why? For several reasons:
You work hard and deserve to have the best tools for your work.

A Quick Guide To Shear Care

When you get new shears, or shears back from the sharpener, they are adjusted to cut. The adjustment for tension (or balance as some call it), is a screw or thumb wheel on the pivot of the shears. Beveled edge shears are adjusted to where the blades grab, about three-fourths of an inch from the tip. This enables the blades to slice from the pivot all the way to the tips.

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