Mary Oquendo, Author at Groomer to Groomer - Page 4 of 6

Mary Oquendo

Smile Pretty

I consider one of the most important aspects of a nose to tail assessment during check-in for each pet is noting the condition of the pet’s teeth. Mind you, I do not just willy-nilly open up a pet’s mouth. I exercise caution and approach with care as any pet may pose a bite risk.
As a groomer, why should you care about that pet’s teeth?

Pet First Aid Kits

Keeping Them Current
Grooming Rosie (AKA The Vibrating Wonderdog) was always a challenge as she vibrated as if she was standing on a washing machine with an unbalanced load during the agitator cycle. Rosie suffered from a neurological disorder and I was always on guard when using any sharp tools around her.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

A Mobile Grooming Hazard
Nothing like driving in the pouring rain with all the windows rolled down… Now why would I do something like that?
While windswept, slightly mussy hair might be attractive on someone who looks more like Taylor Swift;

Eye for an Eye

Back when I was in grooming school, the instructor asked a seemingly innocent question. “What would you do if a dog’s eye popped out?” I was dumbstruck. Trust me on this; my jaw doesn’t drop that often. But there it was, on the floor. It had never occurred to me that this could happen. Eyes can just pop out of a head?? Anything else I should be aware of?
The answer to that is yes. As the loss of vision or even the eye itself can happen quickly, prompt veterinarian treatment is essential. It is why you should take a good look at the pet’s eyes during the check-in process.

Who’s In Control?

Every spring a friend of mine lovingly plants flowers along the walkway leading to her shop entrance. Without fail, a client walking their exuberant dog on a retractable lead will decapitate all her flowers. But it is not just the daisies that bear the brunt of a pet that is not in someone’s control.

Personal Safety For The Mobile Groomer

As I was driving down the aptly named Long Mountain Road just after another snowstorm, I looked to the side and half jokingly thought, “If I drive off the road and land in the ravine, I won’t be found until next spring.” The next thought that crossed my mind was, “ Oh crap, if I drive off the road and land in the ravine, I won’t be found until next spring.”

Ergonomics

I decided many years ago that I wanted to be that old lady that zip lines, jumps out of an airplane, and dances to the wee hours of the morning. But, in order to be in a position to do so, I have found it will be far easier to maintain my good health now than trying to repair decades of damage later on.

“Can’t Promise Pretty”

Mary Oquendo coined this phrase back in the early days of petgroomer.com. It stuck in my mind, because in the grooming profession, you can’t always promise pretty.
In a perfect world, puppies, kittens, dogs, and cats, would stand on our grooming tables like statues.

Bleeding Injuries

In the 15 years I have been grooming, one thing I learned is that accidents can and do happen. We do not plan them, but we work with live animals. Being prepared to perform first aid promptly will reduce the pet’s pain and speed healing.
First aid is the prompt care of wounds prior to any necessary veterinary treatment.

All Ears

Dog and cat ears are nothing short of amazing. Did you know they could hear in the 45KHz range, while we are limited to 23KHz? That’s why you can shake a bag of treats and your dog will come running from the other end of the property. Human ears have three measly muscles as compared to 18 in dogs and 32 in cats.

Setting Client Expectations

Back when I was a baby groomer, a client walked into the shop where I was working with her two dogs. I had the client cards already out and knew what to do!
Client: You’re new. Is Katie here?
Me: No, unfortunately she is no longer working here.
Client: Ok, do the same thing as last time.

Effective Communication

We all groom a “challenging” pet. Mine is Molly, a soft-coated wheaten terrier. Molly is a sweetheart. She is easily one of my best-behaved clients. What makes Molly a challenge is her health issues. I have overcome this difficulty because of effective communication between Molly’s owner and their veterinarian.

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